Volume #16: Engineering Society

July, 2008

Our society seems to be locked into a position in which the user’s and voter’s choices determine how we shall live in the future. A disturbing collective urban life in a giant Big Brother House looms, a material and social world in which sensationalistic media and its commercial translation dominate. Our sense of what is real and what is quality is on the verge of collapse. The practice and education of the engineers of this society is determined by short-term effect instead of long-term social responsibility. Culture becomes little more than a market, politics its façade and the city its stage. Instead of reviving old school high modernist social engineering or claiming the need for an intellectual junta, we solicit new forms of social engineering. Where shall this lead?

Volume#16: Engineering Society
160 pages
Binding: Soft-Cover
ISBN 978 90 77966 16 7
Price: € 19,50
Release: July 2008
Editor-in-chief: Arjen Oosterman
Contributing editors: Ole Bouman, Rem Koolhaas, Mark Wigley
Feature editor: Jeffrey Inaba
Editorial Consultants: Carlos Betancourth, Thomas Daniell, Bart Goldhoorn, Markus Miessen, Kai Vöckler
Design: Irma Boom and Sonja Haller
Publisher: Stichting Archis

Volume #16 includes contributions by Pier Vittorio Aureli, Michel Bauwens, Andrew Bullen, Lard Buurman, Roger Cremers, Aukje Dekker, Jan Willem Duyvendak, Erik Gerritsen, Dionisio González, jeroen Heester, Gabu Heindl, Jeremy Hight, Joost Janmaat, Desmond Kwame, Dick de Lange, Jeroen de Lange, Matt Lewis, Neville Mars, The Office for Social Engineering, Wouter Oostendorp, Drehli Robnik, Justus Uitermark, Jouke Sieswerda, Anoek Steketee, Bill Thompson, Urban-Think Tank, Wouter Vanstiphout, Steven Wassenaar, Eyal Weizman

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Article

Whose Europe?

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The ‘New Europe’ and Controversy Around the European Idea – an international conference and workshop at the National Museum-Institute of Architecture after Alexander Tamanyan, Yerevan (March 30, 2019).

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Article

Behind a Windshield: An Unsolicited Narrative

— by

The red brick housing block of the informal settlements in and around Cairo are so recognizable and telling, that the national government is getting concerned about Egypt’s reputation. Not able to stop their spread, let alone to remove them, the government now ordered painting all exteriors to hide the reality of the day.  Yasmin Mardini proposes a different interpretation of these neighborhoods, that ‘normal people’ will only see from the distance of their car. She shows the power of close reading as a way to understand and next, perhaps, to accept and integrate.

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