Event

Volume at Block City Exhibition

— by

Seeing this picture, you wouldn’t think of Volume as cornerstone. But ‘The Block’ issue (Volume #21), produced in parallel to the International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam in 2009, was instrumental for creating the exhibition ‘Block City/The Past, Present and Future of Mass Housing’ at Jaroslav Fragner Gallery in Prague.

The exhibition is based on a fifteen-year research of Dutch architect Bart Goldhoorn into the possibilities of housing development in the future. His concept of the ‘Block City’ is a combination of analysed housing complexes of the 1960s and the 1970s as well as the contextual, individual, but also very expensive ‘Designer City’. Goldhoorn had the opportunity to test this concept in a new town for 40 000 inhabitants south of Moscow. The outcome of his endeavour are four master plans and 150 models of housing blocks created by architects from around the world which are part of a touring exhibition from 2011.

Click here for more photos of the exhibition.

Read More

Event

Pizza and Food for Thought at Trust Design Discussion

— by

Wednesday 15 February, 6-7 pm, at ARCAM, Amsterdam. Make a reservation at rsvp@premsela.org.

Premsela, the Netherlands Institute for Design and Fashion, will host a panel discussion on design and trust at the architecture centre ARCAM in Amsterdam on Wednesday 15 February at 6 pm. It takes place in connection with the conference Social Cities of Tomorrow.
 Coinciding with the discussion will be the launch of Volume magazine’s fourth and last Trust Design supplement. The series has been produced in cooperation with Premsela. The Arcam discussion and magazine supplement will focus on the private vs the public.

Over pizza and drinks, Premsela’s Tim Vermeulen will speak to the researcher and writer Scott Burnham, project manager of Premsela’s Trust Design project; Michiel de Lange, co-founder of The Mobile City and a new media lecturer at Utrecht University; and Henry Mentink, co-founder of MyWheels. Come and listen, participate in the discussion, and enjoy a slice of pizza. Admission, pizza and drinks are free. Due to limited seating please RSVP to rsvp@premsela.org.

Trust Design is a Premsela research project set up to investigate the relationship between trust and design. How can design respond to the contemporary crisis of confidence? What are the components of trust? Can you design trust? And can you trust design? Trust Design 4 is supplement to Volume’s upcoming issue, Privatize!

Read More

Event

Social Cities of Tomorrow

— by

International conference and workshop, 14-17 February, 2012, Westergasfabriek, Amsterdam. Visit socialcitiesoftomorrow.nl for more information.

Our everyday lives are increasingly shaped by digital media technologies, from smart cards and intelligent GPS systems to social media and smartphones. How can we use digital media technologies to make our cities more social, rather than just more hi-tech?

This international conference brings together key thinkers and doers working in the fields of new media and urbanism. Keynote speakers such as Usman Haque, Natalie Jeremijenko and Dan Hill will speak about the promises and challenges in this newly emerging and highly interdisciplinary field of urban design. The keynotes will be accompanied by presentations of ‘showcases’ from various disciplines, such as architecture, art, design, and policy.

Social Cities of Tomorrow explores how urban designers, interface developers, app builders, policy makers, housing coorations, artists, scientists and others can use digital technologies to organise citizen engagement, and to contribute to our social cities of tomorrow.

Read More

Event, Volume #29

Volume #29 Launch in New York City

— by

Join Volume, Mark Wigley, Jeffrey Inaba, C-LAB, and guests at Project No. 8 (Ace Hotel location, 22 W. 29th Street, New York, NY) from 7-9 pm on Tuesday, 13 December 2011 for holiday cheer and urban conspiracy… i.e. the launch of Volume #29. Copies will be for sale, but drinks and music are complimentary. Click here for more information.

Read More

Event

Home-Sense: Dwelling and the Internet of Things

— by

One-day conference on Friday 9 December 2011, 9-18 h. at V2, the Institute for the Unstable Media, Rotterdam. With Rob van Kranenburg, Martin Pot, Ben van Lier and others. Registration: students €15, professionals €35. Click here for more information.

On December 9, 2009, the first Council-conference was held in Brussels. A wide variety of researchers, artists, IT-professionals, architects etc. gathered to discuss questions and answers concerning the Internet of Things. Part of this debate was focused on sub-themes, one of those was ‘Home-Sense’: what are the consequences, implications, questions for our home-environment in relation to the IoT? On April 9th, the world-wide IoT-day, this discussion was continued in Rotterdam on a smaller scale: now, 2 years later, it is time to gather the developments and focus once again on the issues involved. This conference intends to do that by bringing together a variety of professionals and researchers throughout the various disciplines, present/discuss the current status and try to articulate elements that will contribute to the actual, still developing issues of home vs. technology. The morning session will handle the background, architecture, technology; after lunch the emphasis will be on experience, privacy, spheres.

Click here to buy Volume #28, the Internet of Things issue!

Read More

Event

Failed Architecture #6: Concrete Failures

— by

Wednesday 23 November 23, 8 pm, De Verdieping, Amsterdam. With Peter Luscuere and Hielkje Zijlstra. Entrance: € 2.50. Click here for more information.

Failed Architecture shows buildings and urban environments that are malfunctioning, displeasing or have failed to stand the test of time and are currently neglected, abandoned or even vandalized or demolished, because of changing economic, social, political and/or physical circumstances.

In the sixth edition of Failed Architecture, the focus will be on the more concrete, technical and practical failures of architecture. Which seemingly clever building technologies or materials have turned out to have unforeseen negative implications for the inhabitants, users, repairmen and janitors? Which types of buildings are more often subject to failure or usage problems? When can we speak of just unforeseen complications and when are architects or contractors to blame? Which cases are exemplary and what lessons can be learned for future architecture?

Read More

Event, Volume #29

Volume #29 Preview at the Dutch Design Week

— by

Volume #29: The Urban Conspiracy will be previewed Sunday 23 October 2011 at the Dutch Design Week in Eindhoven.

The occasion is the launch of the third edition of the TRUST Design series, a collaborative project by Premsela and Archis. All editions are inserted in Volume Magazine and presented at special Trust Design breakfast events at several venues all over the world. This time we focus on TRUST Design and Faith. Faith and trust are the underpinnings of almost all our sociological and personal constructs, yet both are allusive and largely intangible qualities. What role does faith have in our relationship with design? Can the mechanisms of faith be used to enable trust through design? Apple has created an almost quasi-religion around its products through design, while contemporary faith-based organisations are turning to design as a way to increase and strengthen their role in society. In addition to discussing Trust Design’s central exploration of the relationship between trust and design, we extend the conversation to debate the role of faith – spiritual or otherwise – within trust and design.

Starring: Scott Burnham (researcher and writer), Mathieu Frossard (designer), Corien Pompe (Chief Designer Colour & Material from Volvo), Matthijs van Dijk (Professor of Industrial Design and author of Vision in Design) and Tim Vermeulen (program manager at Premsela).

Premsela Design Breakfast Trust Design, Faith
Date: Sunday 23 October 2011
Time: 10.00 – 12.00
Location: Designhuis
Tickets: 5 euro (including entrance Designhuis)

Read More

Event

Research in Action

— by

Wednesday 5 October 2011, 2:30 pm, Goldsmiths College, London. In collaboration with Christian von Wissel and CUCR, Sociology Post-Graduate Research and Graduate School. With Lilet Breddels and Arjen Oosterman.

Volume magazine presents itself as a ‘project to go beyond architecture’. The ambition to research the potential of and opportunities for architecture in society, and to approach this from a social point of view lead to a unique practice of research, reflection, speculation and action. Two very different projects demonstrate method and result: ‘Architecture of Peace’, and ‘Internet of Things’. Both were titles of two issues of Volume, both are longer term projects in different stages of development and implementation – research-based, action driven.

Read More

Event, Volume #28, Volume #28

‘Volume #28: Internet of Things’ Discussion at NYABF

— by

Sunday 2 October 2011, 1 pm. MoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Ave. at the intersection of 46th Ave. Long Island City, NY 11101. Click here to attend the event on Facebook.

When things start talking back to you…

Literally everything is getting connected these days, your children, dog, car, fridge, even the trees in the park. Data production and data collecting is key here. It has huge potential for creation, and likewise for control. Artists and designers are discovering new fields for exploration, commerce sees new potential and new markets, and governments take further steps in monitoring, mapping and ruling. So what is the role of the designer here? And how should we approach the tension between creation and control?

A discussion with Mark Shepard, Lilet Breddels and Arjen Oosterman, plus our mystery guest…

Read More

Event

Archis/Volume at the NY Art Book Fair 2011

— by

30 September-2 October, MoMA PS1, Long Island City, Queens. Click here for more information.

[nyc art book fair]

Printed Matter, the world’s largest non-profit organization dedicated to publications by artists, presents the sixth annual NY Art Book Fair, September 30–October 2 at MoMA PS1, Long Island City, Queens. A preview will be held on the evening of Thursday, September 29th. Free and open to the public, and featuring more than 200 exhibitors, the NY Art Book Fair is the world’s premier event for artists’ books, contemporary art catalogs and monographs, art periodicals, and artist zines. Exhibitors include international presses, booksellers, antiquarian dealers, artists and independent publishers from twenty countries. We’re proud to be part of the NYC Art Book Fair!

The NY Art Book Fair 2011 will include special projects, screenings, book signings, and performances, throughout the weekend. The Classroom—a curated series of artist-led workshops, readings, and discussions—and the fifth annual Contemporary Artists’ Books Conference—a dynamic, two-day symposium on emerging practices and debates within art-book culture—will engage visitors in lively conversation all weekend long.

Read More

Event

The Milan Breakfasts

— by

Thursday 14, Friday 15 and Saturday 16 April, 9:30-11:00 am, Studio Zeta Milano, Via Friuli 26, Milan. Free admission (limited capacity). Start the day with coffee, croissants and quality conversation on design!

Premsela, the Netherlands Institute for Design and Fashion, and the Design Academy Eindhoven present The Milan Breakfasts, taking place during the Salone Internazionale del Mobile in Milan. We invite everyone to join us at 9:30 am on Thursday 14, Friday 15 and Saturday 16 April for free coffee, croissants and quality conversations on design. International design professionals and educators will talk with each other and the audience about three urgent issues: consumer trust, open design and designing for social change. Before all the galleries open and the frenzy of the Salone takes hold of Milan, start the day with breakfast and food for thought.

Thursday 14 April: Trust This Breakfast
Premsela and Scott Burnham have been investigating the problem of consumers’ waning trust in the products and services they use since 2009 in the Trust Design project. So far, the design world has not succeeded in finding satisfactory solutions. We’ll talk with Burnham, Lilet Breddels of Volume magazine, and the designers Gijs Bakker and Alberto Meda on how design can win back the public’s trust.

Friday 15 April: Open Design
Don’t ask what design can do for you – ask what you can do for design! More than four decades after John Kennedy’s original exhortation, the masses have all the tools, information and production methods to become designers themselves. But is it really true that anyone can be a designer? We’ll talk to professor Paul Atkinson and the designers Yves Béhar, Martí Guixé and Joost Grootens about open design.

Saturday 16 April: Design Matters!
Green design, cradle to cradle and sustainability are gaining ground in the design world. Responsible design is quickly becoming a matter of course. But what about the other pressing issues 90 per cent of the world population is dealing with today? Real design for real needs is a matter of urgency. We’ll talk about designing for social change with guests including Premsela director Els van der Plas, Maria Teresa Leal of the design cooperative Coopa-Roca, designer Jan Boelen, Cheick Diallo and Ilse Crawford (TBC).

Read More

Event

Volume #27 on Aging Launches at the Milan Design Fair

— by

Thursday April 14, 9:30-11:00 am. Studio Zeta Milano, Via Friuli 26, Milan, Italy, free entrance (first served). With Gijs Bakker, Scott Burnham, Alfredo Meda and Lilet Breddels.

With the Western world heading towards a life expectancy of 100 years, and the rest of the world soon to follow, the question is: with the realm of architectural invention on the issue ready for the taking, are you ready to face getting old? And are you ready to talk about it over breakfast?

Volume 27 launches its issue on aging during breakfast at the Milan Design Fair. This issue of Volume explores the question of aging through current architectural typologies and institutional approaches over vast territory – from the nuclear industry that builds until One Billon AD to the top-down and bottom-up growth of New York, Tehran, Berlin and Newcastle – and is a necessary compendium for those who wish to design into the future by understanding the immediate challenges of today.

Included in the issue is a 40-page insert on trust, design and aging, presented by both Archis and Premsela. Over breakfast, Gijs Bakker, Scott Burnham, Alfredo Meda and Lilet Breddels will be on hand to discuss the importance of designing trust throughout the ages. They ask: after the breakdown of trust in the functioning of society, can design win back the public’s confidence?

This event is hosted by Archis, Premsela: the Dutch Institute for Design and Fashion, and Design Academy Eindhoven.

Read More

Event

Archis/Volume and PICNIC

— by

We’re pleased to announce that we are a partner of PICNIC Festival 2011! PICNIC Festival is an annual three-day event that blurs the lines between creativity, science, technology and business to explore new solutions in the spirit of co-creation. This year’s theme is Urban Futures, with a focus on sustainability, infrastructure, society, design and media. PICNIC Festival 2011 takes place from 14 to 16 September at NDSM Wharf in Amsterdam.

Thanks to our partnership with PICNIC, we would like to offer you a 20% discount on both festival Passe-partouts and Day Tickets. To purchase your ticket, go to picnicnetwork.org and the registration section to fill in the promotional code VOLPIC20 before you complete your payment.

We hope you’ll be able to join us at PICNIC Festival 2011.

Read More

Event

The Internet of Things Workshop II: Builders at Play

— by

Archis/Volume and VURB present the Internet of Things Workshop II: Builders at Play. September 2-4, Waag Society, Amsterdam.

Calling on architects, coders, urban geographers, sociologists, and urban explorers interested in bettering the city through digital means. Following the May 7th Internet of Things Workshop at the Staalvilla, Archis/Volume, VURB, Caro van Dijk and Alexander Zeh will organize the second iteration with the explicit goal of creating prototypes observably eliminating the division of virtual/real. Join us for a three-day hands-on workshop where we will create viable and functional prototypes for the city.

The results of this workshop will then be presented at PICNIC 2011, which will take place between September 14-16 at the NDSM-werf in Amsterdam with the theme of Urban Futures. The three-day festival will explore globalization and its impact on our cities, our society and our lives.

Click here to download a PDF with more information regarding the workshop, and/or contact Vincent Schipper (vs@archis.org) to subscribe or to learn more!

Read More

Event

Unknown Fields: From the Atomic to the Cosmic

— by

Summer 2011 Trajectory Public Forum. Chernobyl Exclusion Zone to Baikonur Cosmodrome. Architectural Association Gallery, 11 July, 2011, 11 am – 4 pm. 36 Bedford Square, London. Free for all. Click here for more information.

This year, on the 50th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin’s first manned space flight and the 25th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, we will pack our Geiger counters and space Suits and chart a course from the atomic to the cosmic to investigate the strange natures that stretch from the exclusion zone of the Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor in the Ukraine and Gagarin’s launchpad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Before we leave on our research trip we will be joined in London by an ensemble of artists, authors, scientists and designers to present a series of projects and thoughts motivated by the sites we will be visiting. Through the lens of these 2 events we will re-examine our contemporary attitudes toward the natural world and discuss our cross section through the haunting landscapes of the ecologically fragile and the technologically obsolete. We will explore the ‘Unknown Fields’ between cultivation and nature, between utopian projections and dystopian ruins as we spin cautionary tales of a new kind of wilderness.

Read More

Event

Cognitive Cities Salon Amsterdam

— by

Thursday 30 June, 2011, 19:00-22:30. De Verdieping, Wibautstraat 127, Amsterdam. Entrance: €10.

This first Cognitive Cities Salon Amsterdam will deal with the synthesis of architecture and network technologies. We hope to see many of you at our first iteration of the Cognitive Cities Salon in Amsterdam. It is our combined pleasure to introduce you to the speakers that will engage the conversation about the future of cities at De Verdieping on the evening of June 30th.

Edwin Gardner, architect and theorist. Design researcher at the Jan van Eyck Acadamie and editorial consultant to Volume
Katalin Galayas, Policy Advisor to the City of Amsterdam
James Burke, interaction designer, user experience architect and co-founder of VURB
Kars Alfrink, ‘Chief Agent’ of Hubbub

The four of them will present their thoughts on urbanity, technology and how we are in the middle of it all. But the Salons are not intended to give only the speakers the stage. While sometimes it is important to only receive curated information, we are very much hoping for a lively debate at the event. Be challenged by the speakers, but also do your best to challenge them.

A special call for participation for the next IoT workshop by Volume and VURB will be delivered by Vincent Schippers, Alexander Zeh and Caro van Dijk. The workshop is for architects, planners, coders and others interested in prototyping applications for a more writeable city. The evening will be moderated by Juha van ‘t Zelfde, host of Visible Cities.

Read More

Event

The Good Cause: Architecture of Peace

— by

Thursday 16 June, 2011, 18:00-21:00, Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal. The Good Cause exhibition runs between 16 June-4 September, 2011. Organized by the Netherlands Architecture Institute and Archis in collaboration with the CCA. Click here for more information.

How can construction be an instrument of peace? Post-conflict cities share many problems such as spontaneous construction and a lack of strong civil governance, thus even well-intended projects under these conditions risk fixing inequalities permanently or introducing new ones in the built environment. Can architecture, beyond solving a direct need or problem, add to stability and peace? The Good Cause: Architecture of Peace considers cases that suggest how peace can be materialized.

Complementing the exhibition ‘Architecture in Uniform: Designing and Building for the Second World War’, NAi, the Netherlands Architecture Institute, presents The Good Cause, an experimental research lab that explores the possibilities for architecture to strengthen the transformation of post-conflict urban areas. Gathering statistical data, graphics, maps, movies, publications, fragments of real life, pictures and interviews this temporary experimental space will survey the controversial thin line between the architecture of war and the architecture of peace within the unstable condition of ‘reconstruction’.

Launch Architecture of Peace Website

Complementing the exhibition, the official Architecture of Peace website has launched today. The website is a treasure trove of information regarding the Architecture of Peace topic, and showcases case studies, videos, the ethical code for architects and more. It is set up in order to be as open as possible, so the website only consists of a menu, linking to all kinds of external sources. The site can be visited at architectureofpeace.org.

Read More

Event

The Internet of Things at MoMA

— by

We are frantically and lovingly working on Volume #28. The issue will be dedicated to a forward-looking debate on the Internet of Things (IoT) and the role of the architect in this new landscape. Mindblowing, we think. More on that soon!

In this present climate of excitement and apprehension around the IoT, Paola Antonelli’s next show at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. ‘Talk to Me’ will explore the communication between people and objects. It will focus “on objects that involve a direct interaction, such as interfaces, information systems, visualization design, and communication devices, and on projects that establish an emotional, sensual, or intellectual connection with their users. Examples range from a few iconic products of the late 1960s to several projects currently in development — including computer and machine interfaces, websites, video games, devices and tools, furniture and physical products, and extending to installations and whole environments”.

The Creators Project interviewed Paola Antonelli and got a sneak preview of a few of the objects to be included in the show. Watch the interview here. The ‘Talk to Me’ online journal should be as interesting as the exhibition. At MoMA.org/talktome, the MoMA team shares their “findings, considerations and explorations as they research, investigate and hear from their networks of designers, artists, scientists and scholars”. An exclusive insight into the curatorial process.

‘Talk to Me’ opens on July 24 and runs until November 7, 2011.

Read More

Event

Workshop: Architecture vs. the Internet of Things

— by

May 7, Saturday, 10 architects and 10 coders will converge with the explicit goal to bridge the presumed gap between the Architect and the Coder. This workshop will be hosted by Archis/Volume in collaboration with VURB. The Internet of Things (IoT) workshop is to function as a preliminary exploration of how, why, where and to what end architects and coders could converse and collaboratively mold this new landscape. To put it bluntly, architects are not knowledgeable on the developments and the potential the IoT holds, IoT specialists lack specific spatial expertise, and the IoT has spatial and programmatic consequences. We believe the confrontation, exchange and merging of these two earlier mentioned fields of operation will result in a new ‘discipline’: environment design. The workshop will test these assumptions through discussing what is needed for this new discipline to emerge. The grand ambition is to propose and develop one or more ‘products’ to illustrate this new discipline’s potential.

The Program:

10.00 — 11.00: Introduction to the Workshop: Goal of the workshop, the coming issue V28: The Internet of Things and introducing the participants

11.00 — 12.00: Initial brainstorming session: An expression of how these two fields might merge, and benefit from each other’s expertise. Divide into groups

12.00 — 12.30: a quick break

12.45 — 13.00: Commence work
15.30 — 16.30: Conclusion: Presentation of proposals and projects Wrap-up and final discussion

The pre-prescribed goal of this workshop is to create a platform for the crosspollination of two seemingly divided groups with a variance of expertise. In addition, this workshop will be manifested within the pages of the V28 as an article. Architects and coders that would like to get involved please send an e-mail to us to see if there is still space available.

Date: May 7th 2011, 10.00 – 16.30

Location: Archis, Tolhuisweg 1, 1031 CL Amsterdam

Read More

Event

Blogging the City

— by

Thursday 12 May, 10:00-18:00, at Uferhallen, Berlin. Organized by Urbanophil and Architekturvideo. Click here for more information.

The Internet has become the most powerful communication infrastructure developed and used by mankind. It is changing our communication habits and ways of interaction and collaboration, and opens up new ways to disseminate information and knowledge. The Internet is also changing the discussion of urban issues, the distribution of information, how actors communicate and participate in the shaping of our (built) environment. Instead of passively consuming, one can now participate, publish and network. This opens up new opportunities for civil society engagement.

It is not just the technology that makes things special — much more important is the change that goes along with the societal penetration of these technologies. Its great social and communicative consequences are not yet sufficiently discussed and understood. Especially in the fields of urban planning and architecture, the possibilities and new challenges are underestimated and slowly accepted. But there is a growing group of young urban planners, architects and activists, which explore the design challenges and opportunities that derive from the digitalization of space and society. But despite these developments, the urban-architectural blogosphere is just at the beginning. Therefore a conference is organized to discuss the changes, possibilities and limits, but also the challenges.

Check out the Blogging the City website to learn more about the conference.

Read More

Event

Launch of ‘Mokum: A Guide to Amsterdam’

— by

Buy here!

We are proud to announce a new title in our Never Walk Alonely Planet series! After the big success of Beyroutes: A Guide to Beirut, Archis launches Mokum: A Guide to Amsterdam. Mokum will be presented at Paradiso on Thursday 5 May, 2011.

Mokum is an alternative travel guide to Amsterdam that explores the boundaries of freedom in this European capital. How free is Amsterdam in 2011? How are the hard-won rights of women and gays, the freedom of speech and sexual liberties being influenced by the political climate in The Netherlands? Are these rights still visible and tangible in the urban realm? The travel guide challenges its reader to explore and analyze the rights and freedom in Amsterdam. Roosje Klap’s graphic design is inspired by the esthetics of the Dutch free press in the 1960s and 1970s. Every chapter (Devotional City, Protest City, Cappuccino City, Monumental City) is based on a hand-made silk-screen poster from that time. Mokum includes maps, stories, poems, essays, illustrations and photos from more than 40 authors — from artists to geographers, from Amsterdammers to New Yorkers, from newbies to celebrities. Mokum will change your perspective on the city forever!

Mokum is an initiative of the Amsterdam 4/5 May Committee.

Mokum: A Guide to Amsterdam
Archis, Amsterdam, 2011
€19.50
Editor-in-Chief: Christian Ernsten
Graphic design: Studio Roosje Klap
208 p. ills color & bw, 16 x 23, pb, English
ISBN: 9789077966556
Available from 27 April via Idea Books.

The Never Walk Alonely Planet series provides an insider’s perspective on the social and cultural reality of the city, with attention to daily life, political dimensions, and spatial consequences. The guides are appealing to both born and raised city dwellers and first-time visitors to a city.

Read More

2067: The Legacy, Event

‘2067: The Legacy’ Presentation in Delft

— by

Presentation of '2067: The Legacy'

Last week the successful Milan Trust breakfast debate discussed the role of design in creating Trust (trust as product, not to be mixed up with trust as lubricant for sales) with the presentation of Volume 27: Aging and the insert Trust Design: Design, Trust, Aging. (click here for photo’s and ‘soundbites’ of the event A week earlier, the latest Archis book publication was presented at the TU Delft. 2067: The Legacy – Indesem explores the future of architecture presents lectures, debates and student designs from the Indesem 2007 workshop. Both Trust and The legacy reintroduce grand narratives in a discipline in crisis: trust as a major focus for architecture and design, Legacy as strategy to reposition the architects’ role. So, what was the idea behind The Legacy, and what did it produce?

Read More

Event

Milan Breakfast Photos

— by

Premsela, the Dutch institute for design and fashion, has made available a series of photos on its Flickr page taking during the discussion on ‘Trust and Design’ which took place yesterday morning. Premsela and Scott Burnham have been investigating the problem of consumers’ waning trust in the products and services they use since 2009 in the Trust Design project. So far, the design world has not succeeded in finding satisfactory solutions. Scott Burnham, Lilet Breddels of Volume magazine, and the designers Gijs Bakker and Alberto Meda discussed how design can win back the public’s trust.

Photos were taken by Davide Bellucca. Click here to go to the slideshow. Click here for videos/soundbytes of the Trust discussion!

Read More

Event

‘The Future of Architecture’: Debate and Book Presentation

— by

Thursday 7 April at 4pm, Why Factory (TU Delft, building Bouwkunde, Oostserre). 2067: The Legacy: Looking back to the future of architecture in Rotterdam.

Special offer: During the presentation the book 2067: The Legacy will be available for € 15.00 (normal price € 19.90).

The event presents the outcome of Indesem 2007, where the potential of the architect to set the agenda was at stake, tested at 20 locations in Rotterdam. For this festive launch Winy Maas, Wouter Vanstiphout and Dirk Sijmons will debate on the societal role of the architect: research agenda’s, consequences for education and relationships with local politics. What profile can we think of for this figure, that oscillates between landscapes of the future and cities of the past?

2067: The Legacy contains lectures and inspirational input from Herman Hertzberger, 2012 architects, Ronald Wall, Floris Alkemade, ZUS, Wouter Vanstiphout, Michiel Riedijk, Winy Maas, Dirk Sijmons, Salomon Kroonenberg and Juhani Pallasmaa and reports on the discussions and results from the workshops to formulate a future agenda for architecture. Jeroen Musch created a photographic report and Maureen Mooren with Sandra Kassenaar signed for the special design.

Read More

Event

Tagging the City

— by

Tuesday 8 March, 2011, Impakt HQ, Utrecht. Open: 19.30, start: 20.00. Free entrance.

Today’s cityscapes are tagged not only with traditional graffiti out of the spray can, but also with what could be called ‘digital graffiti technologies’. RFID tags and Photos and Youtube videos placed on Google maps also mark and control virtual and physical territories. The big difference, however, is that these new media technologies are mostly used for entertainment and surveillance purposes and not for individual expressions and political statements. The fifth Utrecht New Media Evening features artists, activists, academics, and developers who discuss the new digital graffiti practices, and how they can establish alternative communicative systems that remain bottom-up and subversive.

Keynote speakers:

Evan Roth (USA): co-founder of both Graffiti Research Lab and Free Art & Technology Lab (F.A.T. Lab). His ‘EyeWriter’, made a paralysed graffiti writer bomb again and Roth developed various digital graffiti analysis tools resulting in ‘Graffiti Taxonomy, Paris 2009’ and the ‘Graffiti Markup Language’, an XML based open file format designed to store graffiti motion data.
Jeroen Jongeleen/Influenza (NL): internationally renown for his infamous interventions in public space under his alter ego Influenza, prosecuted for vandalism by the same Boijmans he later exhibited in, Jongeleen talks about the relationship between subversive markings on the streets and the web.

Read More

Event

Review: Voyager 3 at Dutch Design Workspace Shanghai

— by

Midway December we kept on fighting on through the snowstorms for a short stopover in Shanghai. Voyager 3: A group of Western and Chinese architects, designers and artists, presented their proposed contribution for an imaginary third Voyager space probe in the format 20 x 20 (20 images of each 20 seconds), amounting to 7-minute presentations each.

Alicia Framis presenting the Moonlife Concept Store in Shanghai.

The event was organized by Volume and the Platform for Urban Investigation in conjunction with the official Chinese launch of Volume 25 – Getting There, Being There: Architecture on the Moon with The Moonlife Concept Store catalogue inside. The evening was followed by a creative industry event with food/drinks/music.

The first two Voyager capsules, sent into space in the seventies to take images of several planets in our planetary system, venture on into deep space and (potentially) encounter other intelligent life one day in the future. For that reason a representation of life on Earth was selected by scientist Carl Sagan and his team. These sounds and images included greetings in 55 languages, animal sounds etc. Not only was this a rather narrow subset of life on Earth but it also represented a strictly western point of view.

Read More

Event

Debate on Tour: Where Is Tehran?

— by

Thursday 20 January, 2011, 20:00-22:00, The Dépendance, Schieblock, Rotterdam. Entry fee: € 5,-/€ 3,- (students/friends of NAI), register here. Click here for more information.

How has Tehran dealt with rapid urbanisation, modernisation, the Islamic revolution, severe pollution and congestion in the twentieth century? Do the current economic sanctions pose a threat to social cohesion? The architectural historian Wouter Vanstiphout and Tehran expert Ali Madanipour try to get to grips with this complex metropolis.

The prominent Tehran expert Ali Madanipour will give a lecture on the social and environmental developments of the past decades on Thursday 20 January. He will tackle the design, planning, development and management of Tehran, from the old master plan of 1968 to the present-day one. He will also touch on the challenges with regard to social cohesion and other contemporary problems. The architectural historian Wouter Vanstiphout will introduce the speaker and chair the discussion afterwards. This evening is the first in a planned series on the Iranian capital.

Debates on Tour
The NAI Debates on Tour programme is intended to promote the exchange of information all over the world between (mainly) architects regarding current global themes in architecture. During the last few years the NAI and local partners have organised a large number of debates all over the world in which Dutch architects have debated with their international partners, often linked to workshop sessions or architectural guided tours. A series of lectures and debates builds on the knowledge acquired in this way.

Where is Tehran?
The Netherlands Architecture Institute and Archis/Volume are jointly focusing on the Iranian capital. Under the title Where is Tehran? this project investigates where Tehran is at the moment in terms of geography and level of development. This research project was launched in October 2010 with a Debate on Tour in Tehran on its architecture and urban planning. It is being followed up with the evening debates in the NAI and a second visit to Iran later this year. Archis/Volume is preparing an alternative travel guide to this fascinating city.

Read More

Event, Volume #26

Photos of the Volume #26 Lunch Launch

— by

In the midst of the snow blizzard which turned Amsterdam white and matching with the cover of Volume #26, the Architecture of Peace issue was launched in SPUI25 with a lunch time debate. Editor-in-Chief Arjen Oosterman pointed out some of the dilemmas involved in working in post conflict areas and looked at the ethical codes used in the design field. Architect Rory Hyde wondered whether and how aesthetics played a role when ethics are so badly needed. It leaded to a lively discussion that will be put online in the coming days for those who couldn’t make it through the snow.

Click here to visit a gallery on Facebook with pictures of the event. Below you can find a live registration of the Lunch Launch.

Read More

Event, Volume #26

Volume Presents: How Do We Materialize Peace?

— by

Friday December 17, 2010, from 12:45-14:00, at SPUI25 (Spui 25-27, Amsterdam). Click here to register.

Can architecture establish and perpetuate peace? Does it have anything to offer on that level? Often architecture has been accused of causing tension, social unrest and even segregation. To be accused of such effects it must be powerful. So let’s explore this strength in a pragmatic positive direction: architecture’s contribution to post-conflict reconstruction. For the presentation of Volume 26: Architecture of Peace a debate on two themes will be held at Spui 25, Amsterdam:

Is an ethical code for architects needed and if so, what should it look like?
What is the relation between ethics and esthetics?

Presentations by Rory Hyde and Arjen Oosterman.
Door open: 12:15 w/ sandwiches.
Debate: 12:45—14:00.

This event is kindly supported by the Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds.

Read More

Event, Volume #25

Launch of Volume #25 in Shanghai

— by

After its successful launch in Amsterdam, Archis will organize a special Asian launch of Volume #25 on December 19 in honor of the Moon Life Concept Store by Alicia Framis in Shanghai.

The launch at the Dutch Design Workspace in Shanghai will be followed by a PechaKucha-style Night with Voyager 3 as a special theme. Participants are asked to give short presentations on a concept or object that they suggest to send with an imaginary Voyager 3 — the spaceship that will be sent into deep space and might be found by ‘other intelligent life’. What should those ‘aliens’ know about Earth? And what is worth keeping, telling about or remembering from our small planet? PechaKucha has invited 15 creatives form the art and design world to present their ideas and hope we’ll evoke a discussion on the values of current design.

For more information, please download the flyer (PDF).

Read More

Event

Speculations on the Cultural Organisation of Civility

— by

29-30 October, 2010, SKOR, Amsterdam. With Arjen Oosterman (Editor-in-Chief of Volume), a.o. More information here.

The two-day symposium Speculations on the Cultural Organisation of Civility seeks to connect current debates about care and citizenship in contemporary art, philosophy and politics to realities of healthcare organisation in the Netherlands and internationally. With a focus on healthcare as a prime site of global market-driven transformation in governmental policies, this symposium brings together philosophers, artists, curators and politicians to question the role of art and its assumed ameliorative function.

We ask: If art consensualises the increasingly capitalised infrastructures of public care, can it still act as a critical agent? The structure of this symposium stages theories and case studies to come hand in hand, providing a significant and radical overview of the field.

Friday October 29, 2010 noon-9 pm
Programme Day 1
What are we doing there? Politics and Philosophies of Publicness
Official language: English

Saturday October 30, 2010 10 am-6 pm
Programme Day 2
Who Cares? Case studies of art, curating and healthcare.
Official language: English

Prologue (Extended programme)
Leading to the symposium, a series of artistic events and activities will take place in the city. Two invited expert meetings, a film programme and a series of Artist Positions

‘Speculations on the Cultural Organisation of Civility’ is the first in the series of symposia Actors, Agents and Attendants that aims to discuss the role of art and the creative industries in the formation of contemporary civility. Specifically, it will question how the current infrastructural and aesthetic relation between art and our increasingly destabilised civic institutions can aid or abet critical forms of public acting. Along with radical shifts in governance and ideology, the concept of what it means to author acts of art in public has shifted dramatically. This series of symposia extends SKOR’s activities towards a more discursive arena in order to develop new strategies for commissioning art in public space.

Read More

Event, Volume #25

Presentation of Volume #25

— by

Yesterday Archis officially launched Volume issue 25, ‘Getting There Being There’, at Athenaeum Bookstore in Amsterdam. ‘Getting There Being There’ is about the Moon as an extreme architectural ambition. It puts forward the question what the role of the architecture could be in the collective adventure of further Moon discovery. Editor-in-Chief Arjen Oosterman explained some about the editorial decision to investigate the possibilities of future Moon colonization. Artist Alicia Framis spoke about the catalogue of Moon products that comes as a supplement with this issue. The catalogue shows all products made for the project MoonLife Concept Store which will open its doors in Shanghai in December this year. Volume #25 is for sale at your local bookstore and online at NAi Booksellers.

Read More

Event, Volume #25

Launch of Volume #25

— by

We’re going to the Moon! Join us for the launch of our jubilee issue, ‘Volume #25: Getting There Being There’ and Alicia Framis’ MoonLife Concept Store Catalog. Come along on Sunday 24 October at 3 pm at Athenaeum News Centre, Spui 14-16, Amsterdam.

Read More

Event

Vacant NL: Renaissance of the Ruins

— by

This year’s Dutch pavilion at the Venice Biennale hosts ‘Vacant NL’, an inventory of empty buildings irrespective of their age or former function. Five thousand of these dormant shells, all government property, are shown as miniature models to indicate the millions of square meters vacant (floor) space in the Netherlands alone. Volume editors Rem Koolhaas, Mark Wigley, Jeffrey Inaba and myself gave a first reaction on the theme, and presented some ideas for further exploration during the opening weekend. In particular, Rem Koolhaas presented OMA’s experience with changing an old prison in the Netherlands in the early 1980s; Jeffrey Inaba connected VOLUME’s latest issue on counterculture as a mentality and socio-political experiment with respect to the task presented here; Mark Wigley stressed the normality and necessity of a certain percentage of empty building stock, pointing at the inspirational and stimulating aspects. My five remarks, presented while seated below the ‘low ceiling’ of the blue foam marquette in the Dutch pavilion, reappear below.

1. If AMO/OMA, in one of the rooms of this exhibition’s main pavilion, states that it ‘has been obsessed, from the beginning, with history’ (propagating an ‘almost doing nothing’ approach), I can also remark that VOLUME/Archis has been obsessed from its beginning with empty buildings. The reasons may in part have been banal – the need of cheap office space – but the engagement was and is sincere. Archis is currently housed in the former health service center of Shell in Amsterdam and is involved in the reuse of other buildings on this huge inner-city site. We are also addressing the issue of what to do with the larger part of the former Shell terrain that awaits redevelopment, after most of its abandoned laboratory buildings have been demolished although the projected residential buildings have been put on hold. The expected delay in redevelopment will be 5 to 10 years, leaving the site as a fenced-off, empty sand pit for years to come. So my first remark is: vacancy is not only about empty buildings, but also about empty land and vacant plots.

Read More

Event

Bamboo Building Bash

— by

22 September-24 September, 2010, PICNIC Festival, Westergasfabriek, Amsterdam. More information here.

Build architectural constructions of bamboo around a wooden bicycle track. The track, commissioned by Mediamatic, was designed by DUS Architects and will serve as the ‘city-ring’. Around it we’ll create an urban bamboo landscape. Every hour you’ll see the structure grow, until it’s a massive bamboo-constructed city. Antoon Versteegde is known for his immense installations constructed in the public space. DUS Architects specialize in social architecture.

Please RSVP if you want to participate. The chance to work on such a project doesn’t come around often, and the workshop will only set you back € 25. This is a three day event, so make sure you RSVP for the day of your choice.Wednesday September 22, Thursday September 23, or Friday September 24.

Read More

Event

Farming the City

— by

15-19 September, Broedplaats Westerdok, Amsterdam.

In response to economic and environmental pressures, innovative city administrations are actively seeking temporary land and building uses that support the city and its people physically, economically and socially. Urban agriculture projects can bring positive new life to the many unproductive urban voids that are mushrooming in our cities, leading to better living environments and stimulating local economies.

Through Farming the City, CITIES and the dienst Ruimtelijke Ordening Proeftuin Amsterdam are bringing together farmers, local communities, policy makers, academics, students, architects, designers, technologists, engineers, city users, commuters and tourists to trigger imagination and share knowledge, skills and ideas about urban agriculture. By highlighting the range of innovative projects taking place around the world, it aims to promote existing projects and to explore creative new ways of taking city farming projects forward. CITIES proposes a collection of case studies and examples of urban agriculture projects from Amsterdam and all over the world. The examples of urban agriculture shown in this exhibition are divided into three groups.

Community activism
Typically, urban agriculture projects have been developed by local communities, for example produce markets, city farms and garden allotments. An emerging new public policy focus on community engagement and local partnership working is creating new opportunities for community-based projects to inspire, develop and prosper:

Innovative public policy
Local authorities recognise the benefits of encouraging urban agriculture through existing and future planning and land use policy. Supporting city farming delivers a range of benefits: providing locally-produced fresh food, greening the city, reducing waste, improving public health and enabling the growth of productive community partnerships.

Design, technology and engineering
As economic and environmental pressures rise up the political agenda, technological innovators, engineers, architects, landscape designers, planners and urban designers have responded to the need to develop more sustainable ways of living. New forms of vertical farms, green domes, roofs and walls, water gardens, green towers, green bridges and perfume jungles offer new scope and potential for the viability of urban agriculture.

During the launching event, local actors, active in the urban agriculture field, will work together to define new strategies. Eight workshops, one each city district, will be hosted by city council representatives. For the city center, a selected group of professionals from different disciplines will work on the definition of new visions and plans, while in the other districts attention will be focused on the implementation of existing plans. The final results will be presented during the opening of the exhibition.

Read More

Event

Fashion & Architecture

— by

Exhibition at Architecture Center Amsterdam (ARCAM), 17 July – 11 September, 2010. Free entrance.

Last week the exhibition Fashion & Architecture kicked off with a good party at the Amsterdam Architecture Center (ARCAM). Along with ARCAM and office for architecture and urbanism V2A, fashion label OntFront has challenged four creative duos to enter into a design process. Each duo comprises a fashion designer and an architect who have teamed up specially for this occasion. The results are interesting and impressive.

Cross-over projects are common in the world of fashion as well as in the world of architecture. However, intensive collaborations between fashion designers and architects are pretty new, while there are lots of similarities between the two professions. Both deal with creation of volumes and take constructive principles in mind. At the same time, more and more fashion designers aim to make timeless products that fight high turnover rates, and architects attempt to create buildings and structures that are increasingly flexible, fluid and responsive to the environment. Mutually inspired, the designers cut through the dogmas of their own discipline and allow the visitor an insight into the creative process. The exhibition shows which new design statements have derived from an intense and extraordinary collaboration between professions that have not much in common at first sight. That makes this exploration very appealing and definitely worth visiting.

The four teams involved in the project are Iris van Herpen and Jan Benthem/Mels Crouwel (Benthem Crouwel Architekten), Mattijs van Bergen (MATTIJS) and Anouk Vogel (Anouk Vogel Landscape Architecture), Farida Sedoc (Hosselaer) and Nicole/Marc Maurer (Maurer United Architects), and Kentroy Yearwood (Intoxica) and Jeroen Bergsma (2012 Architecten).

Read More

Event

Out of this World

— by

Oberhausen Gasometer, 2 April – 30 December, 2010. Project of the European Capital of Culture Ruhr.2010.

In the amazing big Gasometer in the German city of Oberhausen, the exhibition ‘Out of this World – Wonders of the Solar System’ is currently taking place. The exhibition sheds a light on the world beyond this world, with particular attention for the effort of mankind to find out more about it. As the Gasometer is enormously big and dark, one really feels like being in outer space, which sets a great contextual atmosphere for the exhibition. Particularly spectacular is the enormous artificial moon hanging down from the roof of the 126 meters high gasometer. It’s said to be the biggest moon on earth, and honestly, I indeed can’t imagine another fake moon to be bigger.

Biggest Moon on Earth, Oberhausen

The exhibition ‘Out of this World’ takes its visitors off on a journey into the cosmos. It shows our solar system as a huge process of growth and decay. Spectacular reproductions of the planetary system, extraordinary images of the sun, of the planets and their moons, precious historical instruments and the most modern technology of space research graphically present to us the drama of the birth and development of our solar system – up to its end. The exhibition ‘Out of this World’ combines natural science, cultural history and artistic points of view. In the spirit of the ‘International Year of Astronomy 2009’, ‘Out of this World’ invites visitors to marvel, wonder and reflect – this exhibition offers us a cosmic experience inside the unique industrial cathedral that is the Oberhausen Gasometer.”

The exhibition starts in the area below the former gas-pressure disc with a space-filling scene: the sun and its planets hover there as if on a disc in a 68 metre-wide room. Large format images, obtained during the latest American and European space missions, show our solar system, its development and its wonderful multiformity. On the gas-pressure disc, cult relicts, historical telescopes, measuring instruments, astronomical charts and old globes – and beside them the most modern instruments of space research are to be found. Here it becomes clear how findings concerning cosmic happenings always made progress when new observation technologies revolutionised the gaze into the depth of the macrocosm and the microcosm. On the basis of the exhibits, it is, moreover, shown how the ideas about the origins and the development of the solar system changed from the myths of primitive peoples up to our scientific age.

Biggest Moon on Earth, Oberhausen

Finally, the arena provides a unique experience of space over which the roof extends at a height of 100 metres. As a gigantic sculpture here the largest moon on Earth, with a diameter of 25 metres, is shown. The installation passes through, with a soft background music, all of the phases of the moon from new moon to full moon. The romantic character of this moon experience supplements the scientific part of the exhibition in a moving way. The exhibition ‘Out of This World – Wonders of the Solar System’ is jointly organised by DLR (German Aerospace Center) and Gasometer Oberhausen GmbH to mark the International Year of Astronomy 2009. It offers unique items on loan from important international space companies as well as museums of technology, cultural history and art. Beyond the exposition the Gasometer itself provides a great view at the Ruhr Area’s industrial heritage and is worth paying a visit.

Read More

Event

Foodprint Toronto

— by

Saturday, July 31, 2010, 12.30–5.00 p.m., Artscape Wychwood Barns, Toronto. Click here for more information.

Foodprint Toronto is the second in a series of international conversations about food and the city. When you look at the city through the lens of food, what do you see?

Following on the success of its first event, Foodprint NYC, which was held in front of a packed house at Columbia University’s Studio-X earlier this year, the program for Foodprint Toronto will include four panel discussions: Zoning Diet, a conversation about the ways zoning, policy, and economics shape Toronto’s food systems; Culinary Cartography, an exploration of what can we learn when we map Toronto using food as the metric, Edible Archaeology, a look at Toronto’s food history in the context of the present; and Feast, Famine, and Other Scenarios — a chance to speculate on the opportunities and challenges of Toronto’s possible food futures.

Read More

Event

Bauhaus Summer School 2010

— by

21-30 July, 2010, Bauhaus Dessau Foundation. More information here. Application deadline: 9 July, 2010. Click here to apply.

The second international Summer School run by the Academy of the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation aims to organise an idea contest within the framework of a summer school, where, inspired by the ‘Growing House’ from 1932, fantasies for a multi-local living in today’s Dessau shall be thought up.

In 1932, Martin Wagner organised the competition ‘The Growing House’ which was announced in several leading architectural magazines. The idea was conceived during a time of radical change in housing policy after ‘the Golden Twenties’: virtually over night the achievements made during this era in building and urban development seemed to have become worthless. The Great Depression had brought on a crisis in the building industry. Housing construction dropped down to a third of what it had been in the 1920s. The housing shortage drove people to the suburbs, into allotments and small summer houses. Some observers were talking about an ‘exodus from the cities’ which could cause cities to ‘die’. For others it was an expression of an emerging new form of settlement. The competition revisited a theme which had already been spreading virulently during the hardship of the post-war years: ‘Growing’ as a form of ‘natural building’ which would offer an adjustment strategy in times of abrupt swings from crisis to boom. 24 model houses were built to designs from the prize winners and members of the working party and were presented in the summer of 1932 in the exhibition ‘Sonne, Luft und Haus für alle’ (Sun, air and homes for all). Despite the crash of the building industry, one of the decisive criteria was the use of the most advanced construction technology, that is industrial prefabrication. Unlike the heydays of the ‘New Building’ in the 1920s, this exhibition presented solutions to those on a low-income who dreamed of their own home: houses which were flexible enough to adapt to shifting economic conditions and a constant change in family structures, and needed a minimum of resources to do so. Also living under difficult economic conditions had made the connection to the garden a prominent theme. What’s more, the exhibition title ‘Sun, air and homes for all’ put an emphasis on the recreational value of the garden. The Berlin exhibition made deliberate use of the metaphor of athletic sunbathing people and created an active link between home and leisure. The entries wanted to be understood as contributions to the emergence of a new type of settlement. But because they were reminiscent of bungalows they were criticised for being merely extendable weekend cottages or summer houses. For Wagner the economic crisis was heralding the end of the market economy and a shift towards socialism.

Read More

Event

A Discussion on Al Manakh

— by

The AA School of Architecture has published a video of last week’s Al Manakh: Gulf Continued discussion on its website. Click here to watch the video.

“Rem Koolhaas and Al Manakh editor Todd Reisz will discuss the implications of the book and OMA’s continuing work in the Gulf region. Al Manakh: Gulf Continued is an essential and comprehensive guide to the cities of the Gulf, produced by AMO, Archis and Pink Tank. A follow-up to the first installment of Al Manakh – made in the very different moment of 2007, this 536-page book of interviews, travelogues, analyses, propositions, infographics and photography explores the growing interconnectedness of the region and the complex impact of the financial crisis.”

Read More

Event

Out of the Box

— by

Please join us at Shelter for an informal get-together with some of the contributors and members of the editorial team of Al Manakh: Gulf Continued, today from 7:30 pm. You will also have the opportunity to get your copy of Al Manakh: Gulf Continued at a discounted price.

Read More

Event

Review: Al Manakh Gulf Continued Debate

— by

By Timothy Moore

Al Manakh Gulf Continued Debate
May 19, Netherlands Architecture Institute (NAi), Rotterdam
With Hani Asfour, Rem Koolhaas, Ronald Wall

After a year in the making, the mammoth Al Manakh marched into the NAi in Rotterdam on May 19, just after being launched a few nights earlier in Abu Dhabi.

Editor Arjen Oosterman commenced by presenting the publication itself. Unlike the first Al Manakh, which ‘looked like it had been dragged off the internet and onto the page’ (wrote Justin McGuirk from the Guardian), Oosterman mentioned Al Manakh: Gulf Continued had another look and feel, which was delivered by editor Todd Reisz and designer Irma Boom: with less focus on architectural extravaganza and more nuance on voices in the region. These voices were structured into four chapters (Crisis and Crises, Vision, Export and Cohabitation) and connected through a system of cross-references developed by Editor Todd Reisz to bridge the often contradictory and overlapping views.

Read More

Event

Al Manakh Gulf Continued Debate

— by

Wednesday 19 May, 2010, auditorium Netherlands Architecture Institute, Rotterdam. Open: 4:30 pm, start: 5 pm. Entrance fee: € 5, reduction fee € 3 (students, Friends of the NAi). Register here.

Speakers will include Ole Bouman, Hani Asfour, Rem Koolhaas and Reinier de Graaf, and Ronald Wall.

Following the release of Al Manakh Gulf Continued, a special issue of Volume Magazine, the NAi will organize a debate in collaboration with OMA, Archis/Volume and Pink Tank. Al Manakh Gulf Continued offers readers another view of urban development in the Gulf region. This time focusing on how the cities remain re-invent themselves and about their position related to the rest of the world.

Read More

Event

Architecture of Peace

— by

Two-day conference, 3 and 4 May 2010, auditorium Netherlands Architecture Institute, Rotterdam. With Jolyon Leslie, Kai Vöckler, Sultan Barakat, a.o. Time: 9.30 am-5 pm (Mon), 10.00 am-5 pm (Tue). Language: English. Click here for the full program of the conference. Please scroll down for details regarding reservation.

Architecture of Peace is an international long-term research and action project in which a large number of stakeholders are involved. The project will consist of local case studies, interventions, university research studios, debates, publications and exhibitions. The public kick-off of the programme will be a two-day conference in Rotterdam, The Netherlands on the 3rd and 4th of May, 2010. Participants include architects, urbanists and professionals from the fields of development studies, sociology and conflict studies.

Read More

Event

O.K. Festival

— by

16-18 April, 2010, Villa Sonsbeek, Arnhem, The Netherlands. With Arjen Oosterman (Publisher/Editor-in-Chief of Archis/Volume) and others. More information here.

O.K. Festival is the first event in the Netherlands that offers a survey of independent magazines from all over the world. Under the title ‘Welcome Magazines’ O.K. Festival presents the energy and the visual explosion of strange, beautiful and original magazines.

One by one they present an answer to the uniformity of the mass media. The printed media are falling victim to increasingly strict formats. Sales figures reign. In the gaping hole they leave behind the independent magazine manifests itself. Everything that is excluded by the mainstream media finds its place here. In this sense, the independent magazine offers a sanctuary to designers, illustrators and writers. It is at times defiant and headstrong, but always brimming with energy and playfulness. Readers from across the world are increasingly drawn to its versatility, originality and creativity. O.K. Festival offers an insight into the full spectrum of independent magazines through various activities.

Read More

Event

Unplanned: Research and Experiments at the Urban Scale

— by

25 March-2 July, 2010, Pacific Design Center (PDC), West Hollywood, CA.

Superfront, an L.A. based exposition centre presents the exhibit Unplanned: Research and Experiments at the Urban Scale. The exhibit boldly presents a collection of radical methods for envisioning and producing space at the urban scale. Unplanned is a group exhibit with more than twenty participants a.o Ae-i-ou, Tomorrows Thoughts Today and Alex Delaunay. It spans architecture, urban design, industrial design, conceptual art, and cartography to present an array of experimental work at the urban scale. Multi-disciplinary practitioners address emergent urbanism, ‘wild building’, and other alternatives to conventional urban planning.

“Just as the discipline of architecture faces a re-imagination of itself in this era of slow-motion global capitalism, the human population finds itself crossing the threshold to a predominantly urban existence. Many of the basic tenets underpinning urban planning – Cartesian geometry, programmatic taxonomy, contextualism – have been subject to skeptical investigation and rebellion in architecture throughout the past decade. Yet conventional urban planning continues, the discipline of urban planning operating much as it has since the 1960s (if not the 1860s).”

Read More

Event

Multiplex Transnational Symposium

— by

13 March 2010, Trouw/De Verdieping, Amsterdam.
More information here.

Nature has always been complete, and yet it is never finished. Technology can expand nature infinitely, but should learn to play by some of the same rules. At the Transnatural symposium acknowledged designers, scientists, artists and architects explore the philosophical, cultural and practical implications of the fusion between technology and nature.

Read More

Event

Architecture of Consequence: Dutch Designs on the Future

— by

19 February – 16 May 2010, Netherlands Architecture Institute, Rotterdam.

24 Architecture designers take the lead, assessing what society needs now. Pursuing strategies the market is hesitant to explore. The designs that are presented are the fruits of an ambition to find sustainable designs for the future.

The international travelling exhibition ‘Architecture of Consequence’ highlights a changing selection of the same urban designers included in the accompanying book. After Sao Paulo and Moscow, the exhibition will travel to the NAi in Rotterdam in February. The designs that are presented are the fruits of an ambition to find sustainable designs for the future. The theme is expanded by exhibiting the selected designs in different scales.

With contributions by 2by4-architects, De Zwarte Hond, Doepel Strijkers Architecten, MVRDV, Studio Marco Vermeulen, West 8, CONCEPT0031, Anne Holtrop, Next Architects, seARCH, 2012 Architecten, Atelier Kempe Thill, Biq Stadsontwerp, MUST Urbanism, OMA/AMO, ONIX, Powerhouse Company, Rietveld Landscape, Stealth.ultd, Van Bergen Kolpa Architecten, Venhoeven CS, ZUS.

Read More

Event

Foodprint NYC

— by

27 February 2010, Studio-X, New York City. 1 pm to 5:30 pm. (More information here.)

Foodprint NYC is the first in a series of international conversations about food and the city. From a cluster analysis of bodega inventories to the cultural impact of the ice-box, and from food deserts to peak phosphorus, panelists will examine the hidden corsetry that gives shape to urban foodscapes, and collaboratively speculate on how to feed New York in the future.

The free afternoon program will include designers, policy-makers, flavor scientists, culinary historians, food retailers, and others, for a wide-ranging discussion of New York’s food systems, past and present, as well as opportunities to transform our edible landscape through technology, architecture, legislation, and education.

Program Schedule:

Zoning Diet: Sean Basinski, Joel Berg, Nevin Cohen, Stanley Fleishman
Culinary Cartography: Jonathan Bogarín, Makalé Faber Cullen, David Haskell, Naa Oyo A. Kwate
Edible Archaeology: Rebecca Federman, William Grimes, Annie Hauck-Lawson, David Sax
Feast, Famine, and Other Scenarios: Amale Andraos, Marcelo Coelho, Natalie Jeremijenko, Beverly Tepper
In May 2009 the centre for architecture and arts in The Hague (Netherlands) started a manifestation about the same subject, which also called Foodprint. Check here the Dutch Foodprint program organized by Stroom.

Read More

Event

Bucky Bar: a Tribute to Buckminster Fuller

— by

19 February 2010, corner Witte de Withstraat/Schiedamse Vest, Rotterdam. Open: 10:00 pm.

Jay-Z and Rihanna get it straight, in times of crisis, we need to find shelter. The umbrella is the simplest form of shelter, a personal, private, and dry space in a soggy world. If one umbrella is a private space, what happens when we join 10 together, or 100?

Buckminster Fuller showed us how minimal energy domes could open a way to a more environmentally sustainable future, could an umbrella dome lead the way to a more socially sustainable future? The Bucky Bar is a full-scale model of such a future. A spontaneous public building made from the most common of materials, assembled with the resourcefulness of skill of architects. It shows the power of space for spontaneous gathering, for improvised shelters to host conversations, debates, games or even parties. The Bucky Bar launches the DUS/SUA unsolicited agenda for the City of Rotterdam as part of the Architecture of Consequence exhibit at the Netherlands Architecture Institute.

Read More

Event

Unconventional Computing & Architecture

— by

26 February 2010, the Building Centre, London. Start 9:00 am.

The one-day conference ‘Unconventional Computing & Architecture’ explores new materials for architectural practice in the 21st century. International architects and scientists will explore the decision-making properties of matter and how this may be applied to create increasingly life-like buildings.

Organised by The Bartlett’s Advanced Virtual and Technological Architecture Research (AVATAR) group, the conference aims to bring together architects and scientists who are working with new technologies that are capable of self-assembly and organization. Such technologies may form the basis for architecture generated by unconventional computing techniques which range from the actions of protocells, (entirely synthetic DNA-less agents), slime moulds (simple organisms with very complex behaviours), crystalline computing (using the organizing properties of molecules) and algae (that can be engineered to respond to environments in new ways). Neil Spiller founded the AVATAR Group in 2004, whose interdisciplinary research agenda explores all manner of digital and visceral terrain and considers the impact of advanced technology on architectural design, engaging with cybernetics, aesthetics, and philosophy to develop new ways of manipulating the built environment.

Speakers:
Neil Spiller (University College London), Rachel Armstrong (University College London), Evan Douglis (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute), Paul Preissner (University of Illinois at Chicago), Lisa Iwamoto (University of California, Berkeley), Philip Beesley (University of Waterloo), Nic Clear (University College London), Martin Hanczyc (University of Southern Denmark), Ben de Lacy Costello (University of West England), Simon Park (University of Surrey), Lee Cronin (University of Glasgow).

—More information here.

Read More

Event

Visible Cities #02

— by

3 March 2010, De Verdieping, Wibautstraat 127, Amsterdam. Start 20:00, entrance € 2,50
With Ole Bouman (NAi), Maurice Groenhart (Layar)

The widespread employment and adoption of ubiquitous computing, sensor networks and mobile media into the urban environment have unforeseen implications for how our cultures might come to use networked digital resources to change the way we understand, build, and inhabit cities. Visible Cities presents a revolving programme on how emerging technologies are changing the cities we live in.

After Euro Beinat and Ronald Lenz in the previous edition, Visible Cities #02 sees NAi director Ole Bouman and Maurice Groenhart of Layar talk about the opportunities of augmented reality. They have collaborated on a new application for the urban environment: SARA, an Augmented Reality layer that can show the design of a building in real-time in the city in your iPhone or Android browser long before construction has even started. They will talk about their particular ideas and experiences.

Read More

Event, Volume #22

Launch event: Volume #22 The Guide + Beyroutes

— by

We invite you to join us for the launch of our latest issue, VOLUME #22 The Guide, and the special supplement publication Beyroutes: A guide to Beirut.

Athenaeum News Centre, Spui, Amsterdam, December 22, 5-7pm

Both publications come together in a single packet, and form part of your subscription.

About this issue

Guiding – as it is commonly understood – is not about creating; it’s about helping. The guide has no goal other than to lead someone safely to the destiny of their choice. The guide is skilled; he or she actually can lead the way, but does so without ambition beyond delivering quality service. The guide sells safety where risk is involved.

With The Guide, VOLUME presents a diverse collection of guides and attempts to guide. From strange maps, bike tours and magnetic navigation belts to the conception of Paris’ 13th arrondissement as a series of islands; here, the guide is understood as not simply a service or selling point, but as an exploratory tool, a generator for a proactive engagement with the city.

As a supplement to this issue of VOLUME, we also present the separate publication Beyroutes, a guidebook to Beirut, one of the grand capitals of the Middle East. Beyroutes presents an exploded view of a city which lives so many double lives and figures in so many truths, myths and historical falsifications. Visiting the city with this intimate book as your guide makes you feel disoriented, appreciative, judgmental and perhaps eventually reconciliatory. Beyroutes is the field manual for 21st century urban explorer.

Contributors

The Guide: Arjen Oosterman, Jan van Grunsven, Ole Bouman, Rory Hyde, Atelier Bow-Wow, Michael Kubo, Edwin Gardner, Filip Mischelwitsch, Jonathan Hanahan, Louisa Bufardeci, Sunny Bains, Anastassia Smirnova, Thomas Daniell, Kate Rhodes, Naomi Stead, Thomas Kilpper, Lucy Bullivant, Christian Ernsten, Charles Esche + The Detroit Unreal Estate Agency (Andrew Herscher a.o.)

VOLUME Magazine #22 was conceived and edited by Archis. Supported by the Mondriaan Foundation and the University of Michigan.

Beyroutes: With contributions by Maureen Abi Ghanem, Romy Assouad, Hisham Awad, Cleo Campert, Joane Chaker, Tony Chakar, Zinab Chahine, Steve Eid, Christian Ernsten, Christiaan Fruneaux, Edwin Gardner, David Habchy, Mona Harb, Pascale Harès, Jasper Harlaar, Janneke Hulshof, Hanane Kaï, Karen Klink, Niels Lestrade, Mona Merhi, Elias Moubarak, Tarek Moukaddem, Kamal Mouzawak, Joe Mounzer, Alex Nysten, Nienke Nauta, Ahmad Osman, Haig Papazian, Pieter Paul Pothoven, Rani al Rajji, Joost Janmaat, Jan Rothuizen, Ruben Schrameijer, Reem Saouma, Michael Stanton, George Zouein

Beyroutes was initiated by Studio Beirut in collaboration with Partizan Publik, Archis and the Pearl Foundation. Supported by Prince Claus Fund, Fund Working on the Quality of Living and the Netherlands Embassy in Lebanon.

Read More

Event

Sustainable Building with Bamboo: A Lunch Lecture

— by

The Prince Claus Fund and the Netherlands Foundation for Visual Arts, Design and Architecture invite you to a lunch lecture by Colombian architect and 2009 Principal Prince Claus Laureate Simón Vélez.

Simón Vélez’s aesthetic and technical innovations in bamboo have enhanced its construction potential and challenged mainstream architectural trends. He invented a new method to build foundations and roofs, which transformed one of the world’s oldest building materials, namely bamboo, into a modern resource that meets the strictest international construction regulations and can even outperform steel.

For this contribution, on the 16th of December Simón Vélez will receive the 2009 Principal Prince Claus Award.

What: Lunch lecture
When: Thursday 17 December 2009, 12.00 – 13.00 hrs
Where: Zuiderkerk, Zuiderkerkhof 72, Amsterdam, NL
Register: www.princeclausfund.org

This lecture is organised in cooperation with Dienst Ruimtelijk Ordening Amsterdam, Tolhuistuin en Archis/Volume.

Image: Simón Vélez, Crosswater Ecolodge, Nankun Mountains, China.

Read More

Event

Crisis and Collective in Film: A Round Up of the AFFR

— by

Former Volume-er Simon Pennec gives a round up of his highlights of the Architecture Film Festival Rotterdam (AFFR) that ran from October 29 to November 1 2009.

The 5th edition of the AFFR gathered an eclectic crowd of architects, artists, film-makers, curators and designers for three days of intense programming of shorts, documentaries, long features and arthouse videos. This year, the festival promised to frame the city and its architecture in the midst of the financial crisis; with the selection reflecting on potential urban and architectural futures.

The themes presented explored the highs and lows of architecture: West Coast modernism, Russian Avant-Garde and Architecture of Hope, the legacy of Jane Jacobs and a rich series of city documentaries exploring the ‘Great Planning Disasters’. The vast number of films turned the weekend into a challenge, and the need to strategize and tailor a programme quickly became everyone’s motto. I managed to watch 26 films including 18 shorts, most of them connected to the ‘crisis’ headline of the festival and the collective city.

Read More

Event

Heart and Revolution: Ways of Visioning the City of Tomorrow (Day 2)

— by

City as Heart(s)

“As a biologist, I see cities as living organisms. Pulsating bodies made up of new and dying cells and kept alive by the people flowing through their arteries. Cities grow, swell, change shape, absorb and eject. This is not about cities with a heart, but about cities as a heart; pumping oxygen and fresh blood into the greater metropolitan areas.”
– Jacqueline Cramer, minister of the Environment and Spatial Planning

Hearing these words at the closing speech of Morgen/Tomorrow – the International Urban Planning Congress held in Amsterdam – one may travel into the memory of “The Heart of the City”, theme of the 8th International Congress of Modern Architecture (CIAM VIII, 1951, Hoddesdon, England). Today, as then, it was an important moment where urban planners and architects from all around the world gathered to discuss the City as a living liveable centre (core/cuore/coeur). Still today it has a fundamental role in the balance of the expanded new (Open) City.
As an Open City enthusiast, Kees Christiaanse speech alerted to the present status of worldwide metropolises, dealing with the multiple layers of their multicultural heritage: “The enemies of the open city are the open city itself”. Thus, the coexistence of ethnic communities which do not communicate with one another (the favelas of São Paulo and the city of Jakarta were examples given) and rather just inhabit in the same metropolitan structure it is a phenomenon that must be surpassed by city government. Exploring deeper the Netherlands point of view on the Open City, Zef Hemel’s (Substituting the canceled speech of Anastasia Volynskaya’s) presented his “Free State of Amsterdam” speech in a cheerful tone of positive aura upon Planning, as described by his nine “Amsterdam Principles”. The focus on the city of Amsterdam continued in the afternoon workshop “Urban Governance and Liveable cities”, where Maarten van Poelgeest (Alderman of Amsterdam for Town and Country Planning) and Hessel Boerboom (Ministry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations) could reveal a bit of Amsterdam projects for the future.

Read More

Event

A Lighthouse for Lampedusa!

— by

Friday November 20, 5 pm, The Forum, NAI. Admission is free.

Every Friday afternoon during the Open City Event Program, a local “cultural ambassador” hosts a performance, presentation or discussion related to the theme of the week. Tomorrow evening, Lilet Breddels of VOLUME magazine will present artist Thomas Kilpper and his project/competition for A Lighthouse for Lampedusa! Following a film and short lecture by Kilpper, a discussion with curator Marina Sorbello will explore the possible role of art and architecture in socio-political issues.

A Lighthouse for Lampedusa!
Almost every day there are news reports of refugees arriving at Europe’s southern shores. In 2008, about 30,000 refugees reached Europe via the Italian island of Lampedusa. Thousands drown in the sea—aid organizations estimate that one out of ten migrants die during this dangerous crossing. For the relatively small island of Lampedusa, with about 4,000 inhabitants, the endless stream of arriving migrants causes a lot of practical problems, bringing the administration to the brink of collapse. In 2008, the refugee center reached breaking point when up to 2,000 people were held in confinement under cramped conditions, in a space designed for a maximum of 700 people. Instead of helping Lampedusa to ease the situation on the ground and to relocate the migrants to the mainland like in the past, the Italian government further escalated the problem when it insisted that the detained migrants be kept on the island, and to erect a second detention- and deportation-center for them. In January 2009, the islanders went on a general strike against these plans, using the slogan: “No Alcatras in Lampedusa.” Participants expressed their desire to live on an open island: “To live from tourism and to welcome the poorest of the poor if they arrive…” (quotation of the Mayor of Lampedusa, 2009)

Read More

Blog, Event

Tomorrow, Day 1

— by

By Ana Catarino

In Paris: Invisible City Bruno Latour and Emilie Hermant invite us to look at the city of Paris from a rather unusual perspective, what is usually not showed in social theory studies, to look at a city and try to unveil all the layers that constitute its life, to try to understand the several levels of complexity and their existing and possible intersections.

A city is more than the urban or social environment. That is to summarize what this study tries to show, discussing a metropolis like Paris. Complementary to that, this study also exemplifies the main concepts of Bruno Latour’s theory of actor-networking analysis of the social (explained in his book Re-assembling the social, introduction to actor-network-theory), meaning: picking an object and starting to unveil all the layers like peeling a onion, one after the other, and see where the layers intersect, where they combine, but also where they diverge. Only when we take account of the totality of layers unveiled all together in one flattened perspective instead of a hierarchical one, can we achieve a full understanding of the object we intend to study. Flattening the perspective also means assuming the point of view of the insider according to Latour, and not anymore the scientist who detaches himself from the object. On the contrary, he must be fully embedded in it to fully understand it, to fully acknowledge what the object is made of and how it functions.

Read More

Event

NAi Debates on Tour: The African City Center and its Future

— by

A report from the African Perspectives conference in Pretoria, South Africa

Each year, the Netherlands Architecture Institute, organizes worldwide approximately eight Debates on Tour. Together with a local counterpart, Dutch architects fly to a specific city to discuss specific themes, problems and challenges with their local counterpart. On 28th of September the NAi teamed up with ArchiAfrica to host a debate in Pretoria, South Africa during the African Perspectives conference. Arjen Oosterman joined in to write the following report.

Opening by moderator Antoni Folkers.

A confrontation of experiences from different parts of the world, centered on roughly the same theme or problematics, is rewarding by default. The Debates on Tour-program of the NAi, is based on this format. These debates have more than one edge: it acts as an antenna to ‘receive’ new developments, ideas and positions; it connects Dutch and international networks; it presents the NAi in different contexts throughout the world; and it proposes new agendas for architecture in non-hierarchical order.

Read More

Event

SolarDecathalon 2009

— by

About Solar Decathlon

For three weeks in October 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy will host the Solar Decathlon—a competition in which 20 teams of college and university students compete to design, build, and operate the most attractive, effective, and energy-efficient solar-powered house. The Solar Decathlon is also an event to which the public is invited to observe the powerful combination of solar energy, energy efficiency, and the best in home design.

Exact dates of the 2009 event are:

Oct. 8-16—Teams compete in 10 contests
Oct. 9-13—Houses are open to the public
Oct. 15-18—Houses are open to the public
Oct. 19-21—Teams disassemble their houses.
The Solar Decathlon houses will be open for public tours 11 a.m. –3 p.m. Monday–Friday and 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Please note that all homes will be closed Wed., Oct. 14.

Read More

Event, Volume #20

Launch Volume 20: Storytelling

— by

Saturday, 19 September, 7-9 pm
Studio-X, New York

Please join us for the launch of “Volume 20: Storytelling,” edited by C-Lab on Saturday, 9/19 from 7-9pm at Studio-X. Mark Wigley will offer an introduction and comments on the occasion of Volume’s milestone 20th issue. Drinks and music to follow. Sponsored by Studio-X.

With Contributions by: Lewis Lapham, Tom McCarthy, Bjarke Ingels, Neil Denari, Nicholas Lemann, Roger Dean
Catherine Hardwicke, Smiljan Radic and more…

Studio-X
180 Varick Street, Suite 1610
Between King and Charleton Streets
1 train to Houston Street
212 989 2398

Read More

Event

PICNIC 2009

— by

23 to 25 September, Westergasfabriek, Amsterdam
PICNIC 2009

PICNIC is a cross-discipline platform for creative conversation and collaboration. It’s a unique festival featuring a strategic conference, complimented by hands-on workshops and matchmaking sessions.

One of the themes sounds especially interesting when considering the built environment: Exploding Media

Exploding Media will showcase the latest changes in media technologies impacting user interaction, engagement, and communications with a special focus on gaming, connectivity and real-time social media.

This is the story of the extraordinary transformation of Media from all the creative and technological aspects. From traditional storytelling to the impact of gaming on education, from city interaction and augmented reality to the Metaverse, this narrative will feature the latest innovations and disruptions that the media industry is facing. We will look at the emerging opportunities and business implications for the creative industry that these changes will bring. Speakers will be the creative geniuses pushing the envelope on these new developments.

For a more elaborate analysis of what this years PICNIC has to offer those interested in the spatial implication of technology check out The Mobile City

Read More

Event

Tomorrow: Cities Can Save the World

— by

1 & 2 October 2009, Westergasfabriek Amsterdam
Tommorrow, International Urban Planning Congress Amsterdam

Metropoles – world cities – are lead players in the global economy. Though they cover just 2 percent of the earth’s surface, cities consume 75 percent of the resources utilized by humankind.

In the early 20th century, when Alderman F.M. ‘Floor’ Wibaut (1859-1936), a pioneering steersman of Amsterdam’s urban development and social housing policy, was politically and professionally active, the growth of major cities around the world seemed to attain an absolute peak.

Endeavouring to steer the city’s ongoing development was therefore an exercise as urgent as it was logical. It was at this time that town and regional planning emerged in a fruitful interchange of knowledge and experience between administrators and specialists.
Half the world’s population now resides in cities. Metropolises are sprouting up in Asia, Africa and South America at an unprecedented rate. Within 20 to 30 years some three quarters of the world’s population will be living in cities, giving rise to new issues. Cities elsewhere will over that same time-span need to find a response to population growth that is levelling off or even shrinking populations. The fields of urban development and spatial planning, now a century old, are faced with new challenges.

‘The future governance of Amsterdam will be focused on the material prosperity and mental welfare of the great mass of workers. Tomorrow the meaning of the word “prosperity” will be something quite different to what this word meant to Amsterdam in bygone times as chronicled by our historians and eulogized by our poets …. The advancement of prosperity as a responsibility of governments will in future entail the implementation of governmental provision of collective amenities across an ever-broader range of that great multitude’s collective needs, in every domain where collective services prove to be more efficient than individual provision. …

‘We are seeing the emergence of the view that the promotion of welfare – as far as this can nowadays be a task assumed by government – must be based on the exertion of governmental powers to introduce collective amenities for acknowledged needs wherever social expediency requires it.’

Dr F.M. Wibaut in his ‘Tomorrow’ speech (1925)

With: Ken Livingstone, Maarten Hajer, Hermann Scheer, Tim Lang, Eric Corijn, Dieter Läpple, LaDonna Redmond, Michael Madison, Kees Christiaanse, Irina Ivashkina, P.K. Das, Edi Rama

more info can be found here and in this PDF

Read More

Blog, Event

WPA 2.0

— by

Register deadline: July 24, 2009 / Submit deadline: August 7, 2009
Student Edition Register deadline : October 16, 2009 Submit deadline: November 2, 2009

picture-6

Paraphrasing the earlier WPA (Works Progress Administration) of 1939, this WPA (Working Public Architecture) is seeking to exploit the potential of the infrastructure investments of the Obama administration as a opportunity to exhibit the power of architecture’s imagination is applicable to more than generating icons. Architects are called upon to take back the streets, to apply their architectural intelligence beyond the traditional boundaries of their discipline.

cityLAB, an urban think tank at UCLA’s Department of Architecture and Urban Design, announces a call for entries to “WPA 2.0: Working Public Architecture.” WPA 2.0 is an open competition that seeks innovative, implementable proposals to place infrastructure at the heart of rebuilding our cities during this next era of metropolitan recovery. WPA 2.0 recalls the Depression-era Works Projects Administration (1935-43), which built public buildings, parks, bridges, and roads across the nation as an investment in the future—one that has, in turn, become a lasting legacy. We encourage projects that explore the value of infrastructure not only as an engineering endeavor, but as a robust design opportunity to strengthen communities and revitalize cities. Unlike the previous era, the next generation of such projects will require surgical integration into the existing urban fabric, and will work by intentionally linking systems of points, lines and landscapes; hybridizing economies with ecologies; and overlapping architecture with planning. This notion of infrastructural systems is intentionally broad, including but not limited to parks, schools, open space, vehicle storage, sewers, roads, transportation, storm water, waste, food systems, recreation, local economies, ‘green’ infrastructure, fire prevention, markets, landfills, energy-generating facilities, cemeteries, and smart utilities.

Read More

Blog, Event

IABR Open City: Designing Coexistence

— by

International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam: Open City
from 24-9-2009 to 10-1-2010

With its young architecture biennale, Rotterdam will again make an effort to grasp the attention of the architecture world. After three architecture biennale’s on mobility (2003), ‘the flood’ (2005) and power (2007) on the 24th of September the fourth biennale will open, themed: Open City and curated by Kees Christiaanse

(…) an Open City is a place where different social groups co-exist, cultural diversity is present, differences in scale are visible, and urban innovation and probably economic development are taking place. When all these factors come together, it can have a positive effect. We can then speak of an Open City.
Open City is not a city; it is a condition of a part of the city. The word ‘condition’ indicates that the situation is finite, that the situation changes owing to other influences. And I’m only talking about parts of the city because it’s an illusion to think that the whole city can be designed as an Open City, or that this can be engineered. Usually for political reasons, every city contains areas that are potentially open, and other areas that will never be open.

– Kees Christiaanse, interviewed by Archined

This main theme will be worked out by international teams of curators in six sub-themes: Community, Collective, Refuge, Squat, Reciprocity and The Make-able City

Volume will work with sub-curators Bart Golhoorn of Project Russia and Aleksander Sverdlov, who work on the theme ‘collective’ to make a collaborative Volume issue (#21). Also Partizan Publik’s project Social Housing after the Soviets will be part of this issue and the IABR exhibition.

Read More

Blog, Event

Foodprint Symposium Review

— by

Only two years after the pioneering, arty visions of food production in cities featured in 2007 exhibition Edible cities at NAi-Maastricht, we can say that today urban agriculture is considered as an important feature in architecture design and urban planning. And that it’s a fashionable topic too. 
’In the past if you were proposing to put gardens on top of your buildings, you were considered as crazy. Now you’re considered crazy if you don’t’, said architect Andre Viljoen, one of the speakers at the Foodprint symposium, hosted by Stroom, Den Haag on June 26.

Integrating food production with urban activities might sound strange, but in fact cities are always shaped after the type of food system feeding them. 
Author of the influential book Hungry City, Carolyn Steele explained that the first cities were born in the so-called ‘fertile crescent’ in order to manage the surplus of food production in the surrounding countryside. In pre-industrial cities the wealth of the city was linked directly to the wealth of its countryside: Ambrogio Lorenzetti’s fresco ‘Allegoria del Buon Governo’ represents the ‘good government’ as a balance of city and countryside. 
In pre-industrial cities food production had to be located in proximity to urban settlements – as German economist Heinrich von Thuenen formalized in his 1826 model. But after the introduction of railroad transportation, and the introduction of industrial processes in agriculture, food production started to progressively disconnect from cities, which in turn could explode in size and population.

Read More

Event

A Conversation in Venice

— by

On Friday June 5th, 2009 Al Manakh’s series of international Debates on Tour took place at the ADACH Pavilion at the 53rd Venice Biennale of Art. For this occasion architect Rem Koolhaas and curator of the ADACH Pavilion Catherine David engaged in a conversation with Ole Bouman on the curiosities and conditions that has drawn their practice and vision to the Gulf cities such as Abu Dhabi. In this, they discussed the specific urban conditions of cities in the region, and how these influence and are determined by the social/economic make-up and cultural manifestations of the city itself. Also discussed is how exposure to these circumstances has influenced the practice and personal perspective of these two internationally acclaimed cultural producers.

Comments and questions from audience members – such as Mishaal Al Gergawi (of the Dubai Culture & Arts Authority) and Kaiwan Mehta (Mumbai based architect and particpant in the ADACH exhibition) – supplemented the discussion with further insight to the relationship between the cultural ambition and political will, as well as the relationship between cultural frameworks and the actual urban plan of a city.

Read More

Event

Foodprint: Symposium

— by

Largely hidden from the view of the city dweller, a worldwide network of food producers and supermarket chains takes care of our supply of daily food. This is very convenient, but it is also the cause of many problems. A handful of distributors decides what we eat. For the most part the people who produce the food are invisible. The natural seasons are passed by. Transport puts a heavy toll on the environment and climate. Supply is dependent on the amount of fuel available. There is hardly any knowledge of how our food is actually produced. The return of food production to the city might help to increase this awareness and might also create healthy and safe food within the boundaries of a more sustainable city. This requires a new way of looking at the city, where nature, the production landscape and the recreational landscape are linked to urbanism in a more ‘natural’ way. With Foodprint Stroom aims to explore the possibilities of The Hague as a production landscape and to develop utopian, appealing and feasible proposals.

Speakers
Henk de Zeeuw, Paula Sobie (CA), Debra Solomon, Katrin Bohn (UK), André Viljoen (UK), Jan Willem van der Schans, Janneke Vreugdenhil, Christina Kaba (ZA), Nils Norman (UK), Menno Swaak, Paul Bos, Onno van Eijk, John Thackara (UK), Bart Pijnenburg, Gaston Remmers, Tracy Metz, Christien Meindertsma, Joep van Lieshout, Nicole Hoven, Maarten Doorman, Will Allen (VS), Jago van Bergen, Vincent Kuypers, Dick Veerman, Carolyn Steel (UK), Gerwin Verschuur, Winy Maas, Annechien ten Have en Rob Baan.

Read More

Event

Imagining Recovery Exhibition at Berlage

— by

16 June 2009 – 26 June 2009 at Berlage Institute – Botersloot 25, Rotterdam

Imagining Recovery is an exhibition based on an international competition charging designers to collectively imagine innovation recovery through design. Designers were asked to offer their expertise in designing a means of getting from the present to the image of recovery.

On 20 January 2009, the first day of the Obama presidency, began the current administration’s commitment to transparency, participation and collaboration in government. On 17 February, President Obama signed the Recovery Act into law and launched Recovery.gov, a website publishing the spending of recovery funds in the name of transparency, offering “maps, charts, and graphics” to illustrate the distribution of funds.

The exhibition calls upon designers of all types to imagine the futures these maps, charts, graphics and accounting figures serve to anticipate, and to interpret for the public the lived experience of this future by producing an image of recovery.

This moment of change offers an opportunity for designers to rethink their role in our society. Imagining Recovery promotes collaboration by pairing designers with policy makers to collectively write the competition brief, proposing a model wherein designers can actively participate in the initial imaginings of the policies they will be called upon to implement.

Read More

Event

Launch of the Next Volume

— by

the Masters of Intervention event with a lecture by Nader Vossoughian, titled Happy City the next issue of Volume ‘Architecture of Hope’ will be presented at Felix Meritis (Amsterdam):

Sunday 5 april 2009
14.00 – 17.00
Teekenzaal – Felix Meritis, Amsterdam
Special Masterclass at P!ONEER

Can we build a happy city? Can we engineer happiness?
A Masterclass on creative industry, social cohesion, participatory planning and creating new worlds
What is left of the highmodernist ideals? How do they translate into the Wijkaanpak,the national push to uplift the Dutch ghettos? And what instruments have we got to engineer society and change people in their beliefs and behavior?
Nader Vossoughian wrote on the global polis and its engineer of happiness Otto Neurath. He has a strong vision on the knowledge economy, how it creates ignorance and intelligence. Is ignorance bliss? Or do we set course to develop a responsible participatory community? What is the ethics of urban transformation?

Free entry for applicants for this program, reservation is necessary: maakbaarheid@partizanpublik.nl

For more information on the Masters of Intervention go to engineeringsociety.wordpress.com [NL]

Read More

Blog, Event

A New Al Manakh

— by

Al Manakh launches its website at Art Dubai and Sharjah Biennial 9
16-21 March 2009

The team responsible for Al Manakh 2 is expanding its network in the Gulf with researchers, correspondents and photographers. Yesterday, March 16, Rem Koolhaas one of the editors of Al Manakh gave a lecture at the Sharjah Biennial 9, sharing his experiences in the Gulf region over the last five years. Koolhaas touched upon his respect for the region and how his insights to the Gulf have developed through professional experience. He approached the Gulf as a mirror for the Western mind set, as the ultimate extravaganza that architecture worldwide suffered from. Largely developed with Western stakeholders, Dubai heard its first dismissal from those same sources. Now when the credit crisis -generated by the West- is hitting the Gulf region, that same Western world that hugely profited from the wealth is now the first to proclaim its decline.

Read More

Blog, Event

Magazine Exhibitionism

— by

Last week(end) Volume has been present in an exposé of magazine culture around the world. Tokyo and Luxembourg to be precise. In Tokyo, Volume was exhibited in the We ♥ Magazines Library
which opened last week in Omotesando Hills, Tokyo.

Colophon2009 – Luxembourg (see slideshow full screen)

Another celebration of the independent periodical took place in Colophon2009 in Luxembourg. Magazine makers from all over the world gathered in a congregation discussing, lecturing and networking in concert with publishers, distributors, designers and other magazine enthusiasts. Volume was invited as one of the ten Magazines to outfit an exhibition space, capturing some of the spirit of the our publication. Volume’s exhibit was titled “The Situation Room,” referring to the crisis management space under the White House, and evoking imagery of Ken Adam’s War Room he designed for Dr. Strangelove.

On the 7 meter high walls of the Volume situation room two windows on the world were projected, one with imagery of the various RSVP events that were organized since 2004, on the other textual commentary and analysis of the RSVP events. A dialogue between image and text. Between these two projections an eight seat conference table where the agenda’s for architecture that emerged from these events be discussed. Surfacing one of the central drives of the Volume project: uncovering new urgencies an opportunities for architecture.

Read More

Event

NAi debate : Sustainability After Zero

— by

From wacko hippy-esk ideology, ‘sustainability’, or ‘eco-friendly’, or ‘green’ has now become globally accepted. But, as what? As an environmental urgency, as a political issue, as a technical problem, as a historical destiny, or as a new world order? And with which consequences?

The sustainability consensus is dangerous, since the concept has no political content and can be used for any cause. Carbon neutrality and zero emissions are like magic formulas, cover ups for complicated ethical questions about the inequalities in our societies. Architecture is called to rescue the planets future with eco-cities and sustainable design but what is this future is rarely discussed.

We invite you to join us in the examination of sustainability, and answer questions as: whose, what kind of and sustainability in which way? Help us setting the zero point, and let’s search for the strategies after zero and plan more sustainable furtures.

Read More

Event

Fritz Haeg

— by

Artist, writer, architect, educator, ecologist and radical gardener Fritz Haeg is a key figure to foresee and imagine developments in tune with the issues raised in this blog. From edible estates to animal planning…

The 18th of October 2008, in London, he will be talking in London at the Frieze Talks.

Read More

Event

Sustainability in the Post-Capitalist City

— by

Expert meeting Nr. 2 – VOLUME i.c.w. VAN ABBEMUSEUM

Since a sustainable city is often understood as a society of zero emission or carbon neutrality, we decided to ask ourselves:

What happens AFTER ZERO, when this ideal stage is reached? What are the theoretical guidelines and interesting practices for designing a sustainable city?
We think that the experiences of those who work in shrinking cities or cities in ‘crisis’ are in the process of finding answers to these questions. As these places offer a radically different case study on what a normal urban condition is, namely a condition which is not only determined by capitalist development incentives, but rather a kind of post-capitalist condition with a different logic to produce and a different set of ethics.

Read More

Event

Volume Expert Meeting: Food and the City

— by

Did you know? Cities have always been shaped by food.

Different systems of food production, storage, distribution, and consumption patterns affected the form of cities in history, from the first cities of Mesopotamia, to the proto-hydroponic terraces of Machu Picchu, from the post-war Western cities to the Southern Megalopolis.

Our food system is the product of the so-called Green Revolution, begun in the Fourties. But today the Green Revolution shows its limits. Of course, it is criticized by ecologists and anti-globalization activists for the damages it causes to the environment and for its negative consequences for the poor in developing countries. But also, seems that the Green Revolution techniques are no longer profitable for the agriculture business.

Therefore, a new, Greener Revolution is about to come.

Read More

Event

Launch THE READER #11

— by

Volume and Abitare present together THE READER #11 on ‘Ecology of Information’. In line with the Sustainable Dystopias installations, supported by Abitare and designed by Boeri Studio for the 11th Architecture Biennale of Venice, The Reader presents a series of articles which, in discussing the deeper meaning behind ‘ecosophie’, offers readers food for thought about the hot issue of urban sustainability. This issue of The Reader has been edited jointly by the editorial boards of Volume and Abitare, who have selected material from the international press and their respective archives. Volume and Abitare collaboration has only just begun…

Read More

Blog, Event

AMBITION at the New Museum

— by

Jeffrey Inaba, INABA/C-Lab, GSAPP; Mark Wigley, Dean, GSAPP; and Richard Flood, Chief Curator, New Museum, will discuss philanthropy, education, architecture, and other forms of influence. Presented in conjunction with Inaba and C-Lab’s project for the Museum, “Donor Hall,” and the release of Issue 13 of Volume Magazine. Followed by reception and music by Jamo and Nick Kay.

Read More

Blog, Event

Volume Confronts Gillick

— by

At the opening of the Liam Gillick ‘mid-career retrospective’ in Witte de With, Centre for Contemporary Art in Rotterdam, Volume will have a conversation with the artist. Gillick is known for his quality to avoid definition and for his ability to offset expectation. The invitation to present at Witte de With was accepted by Gillick inviting the staff of Witte de With to program part of the space during his ‘presence’ in the art centre.
Volume will confront Gillick’s method of working with the theme of V14: Unsolicited Architecture as a strategy and a practice.

Read More