Article, Volume #6

Desperate Decadence

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Cities arise because of people’s basic need to live and work near one another. The city offers freedom, anonymity, trade, economy of scale, an immediately accessible consumers’ market, work potential – a swarming brew of ideas and innovation that fulfill man’s social, psychological, and economic needs. The city is the motor of progress.

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Article, Volume #2

Towards a History of Quantity

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Not having enough to do, architects often do too much. Devoted with masochistic fervor to a profession whose expertise is routinely ignored, they treat each project as if it might be their last, turning it into an ark loaded with their best ideas compacted into an intense display of effects.

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Article, Volume #2

Borrowed Scenery: In the Footsteps of Laurie Anderson

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At the most abstract level, the task for the artist and for the architect is essentially the same: to specify a frame. The artist’s frame may be entirely concrete or entirely abstract – from an ornately gilded rectangle to a spoken instruction – but always acts to define its contents as being artworks, whether they are newly created or nothing but found objects.

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Archis 1993 #9, Article

De zwaarte van de stenen: Over architectuurfotograaf Jens Lindhe / The heavy presence of the stones: The architectural photographer Jens Lindhe

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The slide showed one of the portals of C.F. Hansen’s Courthouse in Copenhagen, one of the major works of Danish neo-classicism. The technical quality of the slide was perfect and we came to the conclusion that its quality as a photograph was pretty good too.Some time later we needed a photograph for an article about […]

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Archis 1993 #4, Article

Oscillatie tussen materie en concept: De architectuur van Patrick Berger (Oscillation between material and concept: The architecture of Patrick Berger)

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Indeed, Berger had built very little when, in 1988, he won the international competition for the park. His Parisian production was limited to a handful of discreet buildings, the kind of which are too  delicate to please the media or to fill the front page of an architectural magazine. Discreet also is the architect – […]

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Archis 1993 #3, Article

Alexander Bodon (1906-1993)

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Bodon was born in Hungary. His father was an interior designer and cabinet-maker who worked in Jugendstil and was influenced by the Viennese Secession. At the age of thirteen Bodon spent some time in the Netherlands and by chance was introduced to humanist circles where he met Jan Wils. When in 1926 Bodon had to […]

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Archis 1993 #2, Article

Onze negentiende eeuw: Visies op de Nederlandse neogotiek (Our nineteenth century: Views on Dutch Gothic revival architecture)

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If there are any post-modern architects in the Netherlands, then their country’s nineteenth-century architectural heritage seems to have passed them by. It was the art historians who were interested in and theorized about the Gothic Revival, a movement especially suited to their historical constructions and their desire to link the past to the present with […]

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Archis 1993 #1, Article

Papegaai in bodystocking (A parrot in a body stocking)

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The decision of the editorial staff to publish a bilingual Archis beginning in 1993 demanded a new outlook for the word-picture  relationship. Because the amount of text is now double, and visual images are the same in every language, an unbalanced relationship could result. Every possibility has been studied in order to find a balance between `the respect for the text’ and `the autonomy of the image’.

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