Archis 2001 #4

The teaching of architecture in Flanders

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By the mid-18th century medieval guilds like St Luke’s guild for architects had lost their power. The vacuum left behind was filled up in 1751 with the establishment of the first ‘academy of architecture’ in the Austrian Netherlands, in Ghent. Like all the academies in Belgium, it was to become a protagonist of classicism. At […]

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Archis 2001 #4

Siedlung in China

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Picture this: on eight square kilometres of land facing the Great Wall of China, eleven villas and a country club designed by young Asian star architects and billed as an outdoor exhibition showcasing the ‘art of avant-garde Asian architecture’. This aspiration would certainly make it an Asian Siedlung of sorts, like the Weissenhof Siedlung in […]

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Archis 2001 #4

Coming soon. Blind spots in the design factory

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In a large hall on the ground floor of the building were the entries for Archiprix, Archiprix International, the Prix de Rome Architecture, and the Prix de Rome Urban Design and Landscape Architecture, as well as those for the Europan sites in the Netherlands. Assembled thus in a single space was an enormous quantity of […]

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Archis 2001 #4

Architecture: an intractable science

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Let me explain. Architecture seems to me principally to be a field in which highly diverse modes of knowledge are united. Using Adorno’s conceptual framework we can argue that architecture appeals to both ratio – the ability to interpret the world through reason – and to mimesis – the visual ability to recognize similarities and […]

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Archis 2001 #4

With all due respect

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You might remember that Koolhaas discovered in his research on Manhattan a modern American architecture that, unlike its European counterpart needed no manifesto, no vanguard elite to be realized. Instead, the modern architecture that blossomed in Manhattan unfolded according to a complex logic far beyond the capacity of any vanguard to understand, let alone harness […]

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Archis 2001 #4

A computer lady’s perspective

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Novelties benefit from being different and therefore interesting, but they also give good cause for scepticism. They are not per se significant, unless elaborated in a careful and responsible way in order to provide a basis for further progress. New Technologies: New technologies are a major catalyst and an important means for setting inventions in […]

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Archis 2001 #4

City of experiences

In this process, cities are increasingly changing from a community facility to an enterprise. Culture is becoming the key factor in the utility strategies of an economy of attention. Shopping malls, theme parks and urban entertainment centres mark a cultural trend that is accompanied by the disappearance of the boundaries that used to exist between […]

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Archis 2001 #4

An apparent shift

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Language – the reading, interpretation and writing of texts – has been encouraged as a way to develop architectural projects since the second half of the 1970s. Bernard Tschumi wrote of this procedure: ‘The ability to translate narrative from one medium to another – to translate Don Juan into a play, an opera, a ballet, […]

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Archis 2001 #4

The state of architectural education

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Time was when such schools could confidently assume that the knowledge they were passing on was absolute. There was a canon, there were rules and there was a sense of vocation so that you knew what you were doing it for: for God, your country or another, better world. As an architect you were an […]

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