Author

Ole Bouman

Article, Volume #14

Office for Unsolicited Architecture (OUA)

Posted on January 3, 2008 — by

The Office for Unsolicited Architecture proposes an alternative: a new form of practice that pro-actively seeks out new territories for intervention, addresses pressing social needs and takes advantage of emerging opportunities for architecture.

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Archis 2007 #4

Unsolicited, or: The New Autonomy of Architecture

Posted on April 1, 2007 — by

Volume’s former Editor-in-Chief presents the most concrete materialization of ‘unsolicited architecture’, an idea he has articulated in this magazine since its very first issue. Exemplifying how the notion of going beyond architecture can be brought into action, Bouman accelerates into a new dimension of critical practice by establishing the Office for Unsolicited Architecture. Remember when […]

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Archis 2007 #1

The Architecture of Destruction

Posted on January 1, 2007 — by

Ever heard of Kevin Sites? He is a reporter who runs a blog, currently under the banner of Yahoo!, to tell us about his experiences in the ‘Hot Zones’ of the world. Dozens of conflict areas, where he, armed with a camcorder and all on his own, tries to cover ‘how conflict feels on the […]

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Article, Volume #5

The Rise and Fall of Superdutch

Posted on January 7, 2006 — by

Since the dawn of the people’s capitalism, where just about everyone is tied to the ups and downs of the stock market, the concept of the bursting bubble and rapid plume of shares attaining ‘a more realistic level’ has become a wide-spread cultural theme. Not just in financial markets, but in many social domains, we see how certain concepts, brands, and personalities are overvalued or promoted and how, as a consequence, counter-forces oblige them to make a reality check. Hype dies, the public gets distracted, and those who were only recently the center of attention are forgotten for the next big thing.

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Article, Volume #6

Desperate Decadence

Posted on December 8, 2005 — by

Cities arise because of people’s basic need to live and work near one another. The city offers freedom, anonymity, trade, economy of scale, an immediately accessible consumers’ market, work potential – a swarming brew of ideas and innovation that fulfill man’s social, psychological, and economic needs. The city is the motor of progress.

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Editorial, Volume #2

Doing (Almost) Nothing is (Almost) All Right

Posted on July 7, 2005 — by

Few things are as driven by maximalism as architecture. The craft stands out for its almost boundless urge to prove itself. If you want to become a thinking, creative architect, not only must you be capable of doing anything, you also have to do it. Work, work, work: that’s the motto

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Archis 2005 #6

Power to the Client

Posted on June 1, 2005 — by

The world is changing, so what else is new? Not so much. Transformations of our daily life, our immediate environment, and even the more abstract dimensions of our existence such as working conditions, social contexts and frames of references are relentlessly molded to accommodate and facilitate the forces of modernization. This may sound thrilling, but […]

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Archis 2005 #6

Desparate Decadence

Posted on June 1, 2005 — by

Cities arise because of people’s basic need to live and work nearone another. The city offers freedom, anonymity, trade, economy of scale, an immediately accessible consumers’ market, work potential – a swarming brew of ideas and innovation that fulfill man’s social, psychological, and economic needs. The city is the motor of progress. So it was […]

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Archis 2005 #6

The Power of Architecture, Part II (Editorial)

Posted on June 1, 2005 — by

Meanwhile people keep asking us questions… A few examples of the questions we receive Why has this magazine become unreadable, with either too much or too little text? Why does this magazine change so often? Why isn’t this magazine about true architecture anymore? Why is this magazine not updating me with the necessary information? Why […]

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Archis 2005 #3

The Spin of Architecture and the Architecture of Spin. (Editorial)

Posted on March 1, 2005 — by

When the British MP George Galloway was brought before a panel of the US Senate investigating his possible fraudulent involvement in the Oil-for-Food Program, he gave a remarkable diatribe against the Republican majority busy changing the order of things on this globe according to its own conservative agenda. Among other things, he called the Senate’s […]

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